Apolipoprotein E ε4 genotype status is not associated with neuroimaging outcomes in a large cohort of HIV+ individuals.

TitleApolipoprotein E ε4 genotype status is not associated with neuroimaging outcomes in a large cohort of HIV+ individuals.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsCooley, SA, Paul, RH, Fennema-Notestine, C, Morgan, EE, Vaida, F, Deng, Q, Chen, JAshley, Letendre, S, Ellis, RJ, Clifford, DB, Marra, CM, Collier, AC, Gelman, B, McArthur, JC, McCutchan, JA, Simpson, DM, Morgello, S, Grant, I, Ances, BM
Corporate AuthorsCHARTER Group
JournalJ Neurovirol
Volume22
Issue5
Pagination607-614
Date Published2016 10
ISSN1538-2443
KeywordsAdult, Alleles, Antineoplastic Agents, Apolipoprotein E4, Basal Ganglia, Cerebellum, Cerebral Cortex, Cerebral Ventricles, Cohort Studies, Female, Gene Expression, Genotype, Gray Matter, HIV Infections, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuroimaging, Risk Factors, White Matter
Abstract

Previous neuroimaging studies suggest a negative relationship between the apolipoprotein (ApoE) ε4 allele and brain integrity in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected (HIV+) individuals, although the presence of this relationship across adulthood remains unclear. The purpose of this study is to clarify the discrepancies using a large, diverse group of HIV+ individuals and multiple imaging modalities sensitive to HIV. The association of ApoE ε4 with structural neuroimaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was examined in 237 HIV+ individuals in the CNS HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. Cortical and subcortical gray matter, abnormal and total white matter, ventricles, sulcal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and cerebellar gray matter, white matter, and CSF volumes, and MRS concentrations of myo-inositol, creatine, N-acetyl-aspartate, and choline in the frontal white matter (FWM), frontal gray matter (FGM), and basal ganglia were examined. Secondary analyses explored this relationship separately in individuals ≥50 years old (n = 173) and <50 years old (n = 63). No significant differences were observed between ApoE ε4+ (ApoE ε3/ε4 and ApoE ε4/ε4) individuals (n = 69) and ApoE ε4- (ApoE ε2/ε3 and ApoE ε3/ε3) individuals (n = 167). When individuals were further divided by age, no significant genotype group differences were identified in individuals <50 or ≥50 years of age on any neuroimaging outcome. The ApoE ε4 allele did not affect brain integrity in this large, diverse sample of HIV+ individuals. The effects of ApoE ε4 may not be apparent until more advanced ages and may be more prominent when present along with other risk factors for neuronal damage.

DOI10.1007/s13365-016-0434-7
Alternate JournalJ. Neurovirol.
PubMed ID27021072
PubMed Central IDPMC5040614
Grant ListK24 MH097673 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
HHSN271201000030C / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
P30 MH075673 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
HHSN271201000036C / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 NR012907 / NR / NINR NIH HHS / United States
R01 NR014449 / NR / NINR NIH HHS / United States
R01 NR012657 / NR / NINR NIH HHS / United States
P30 MH062512 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
N01 MH022005 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
R01 MH107345 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States
U24 MH100930 / MH / NIMH NIH HHS / United States